Labyrinth Events 2015

Regular facilitated group labyrinth walks will be held at the Centennial Park Labyrinth at 9.30am on the first Sunday of every month, (as well as Solstice/Equinox days and of course, World Labyrinth Day on 2nd May!). Come and experience the powerful metaphor of the labyrinth in a group setting which is so different to walking the path alone. Its an opportunity to learn more about the labyrinth from a trained facilitator and to remind yourself what it is to simply be in community in a peaceful, harmonious way. Walking the labyrinth is a deep letting be of the self and of the other. As Ram Dass said, “We are all really just walking each other home.” These events are free and open to all.

 Labyrinth Facilitators

Sun 1st March: Janice Ellis
Sun 22nd March (Autumn Equinox): Maja Skrlj-Tufegdzic
Sun 5th April: Desiree deKlerk
Sat 2nd May (World Labyrinth Day): Emily Simpson
Sun 3rd May: Wendy Rose-Williams
Sun 7th June: Joan Harcourt
Sun 21st June (Winter Solstice): Karen Quant
Sun 5th July: Erica Webber
Sun 2nd August: Sally Plumb
Sun 6th September: Nicky Harper
Sun 20th September (Spring Equinox): Margaret Rainbird
Sun 4th October: Heather Middleton
Sun 1st November: Heather Keens
Sun 6th December: (Advent) Sally Longley
Sun 20th December (Summer Solstice):  Annalise Thomas

Lauren Artress in Sydney

The woman who kick started the global labyrinth movement 20 years ago, Rev Dr Lauren Artress was in Sydney to train 30 new labyrinth facilitators. On Sunday 1st Feb she was guest of honour at the Dedication of the Labyrinth which included the beautiful music of Corrina Bonshek which is now available online.

Lauren Artress

To find out more about Lauren’s work with labyrinths around the world go to  www.veriditas.org.  Her much loved book is called “Walking A Sacred Path – Rediscovering the Labyrinth as a Spiritual Practice” and is available on Amazon

Simple guide to walking the labyrinth:

There’s really no right way or wrong way to walk a labyrinth, but generally speaking there are three phases:

1. Releasing on the way in – letting go of what no longer serves.
2. Receiving a sense of peace and calm as you pause in the centre.
3. Resolving to engage with the world in a new way as you follow the same path back out.

To prepare, you may want to sit quietly and reflect before walking the labyrinth. Some people come with questions, others just to slow down and take time out from a busy life. Some come to find the strength to take the next step during times of grief and loss. Its winding path becomes a metaphor for our journey and where we find ourselves on our path. If someone is walking more slowly than you, feel free to overtake (easier at the turns). The labyrinth is all about flow and acceptance. As Ram Dass says, “We are all really just walking each other home.”

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ABC Radio National Interview

ABC Radio National program about the construction of the labyrinth in Centennial Park, featuring Emily Simpson, William Zuccon (Architect) and Darren Finlayson (Stonemason). It was broadcast on 1st November and is now available online: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/offtrack/it-is-solved-by-walking/5840076  or you can read a comprehensive article by Ann Jones:  http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/offtrack/walking-sydneys-parkland-labyrinth/5847518

Radio National

Lauren Artress in Sydney – Jan 2015

Sydney Postcard_rev1

Want to learn more about the labyrinth? The woman who kick started the global labyrinth movement 20 years ago, Rev Dr Lauren Artress is coming to Sydney to speak and teach in January 2015. Whether you want to bring the labyrinth to your community or simply deepen your understanding of it, then this is a rare opportunity.

The lecture will be held at the Paddington Uniting Church, 395 Oxford St, Paddington and the workshop and Facilitator Training will be held at Moore Park Golf Club. Lauren will also be holding a special dedication of the Centennial Park labyrinth on the evening of Sunday 1st February. All welcome. To find out more about her work with labyrinths around the world go to www.veriditas.org.  Her book is called “Walking A Sacred Path – Rediscovering the Labyrinth as a Spiritual Practice” and is available on Amazon

If you need accommodation:

http://www.wotif.com/hotels/crown-hotel-surry-hills.html

http://www.wotif.com/hotels/rydges-sydney-central-formerly-sebel-surry-hills.html

http://www.wotif.com/hotels/city-crown-motel.html

 

and if you have any questions please contact Emily Simpson

Quotes from the wisdom keepers

Wisdom Keeper line up

Walking home to country is a connection our people have always had with Mother Earth. Our culture is defined by the closeness of family circles and staying connected to the people within it. The labyrinth invites and welcomes people to walk the path together – it calls them to the land in oneness. (Aunty Ali Golding, Aboriginal Elder, Biripi Nation)

As the wind calls the trees to dance, may this walking reflection invite us to rediscover the genuine rhythm of our human journey.  The pilgrim deep within each of us is aware of an unseen world that shapes us. It calls us to a different tempo that can renew our life. The ancient gospel is a story of such a journey that reveals a new kingdom of love.  May this prayer of the labyrinth lead us gently into a new dance with our one precious life. (Monsignor Tony Doherty, Church of Mary Magdalene)

The labyrinth represents the spiritual journey, inward to our inner selves and the Sacred within, outward to the world held in God’s love and yearning for peace and justice. (Rev Dr Margaret Mayman, Pitt Street Uniting Church)

Meditative prayer connects us with the eternal, singular, conscious being known as ‘God’.  Prayer invites God’s presence to permeate our presence.  Prayer cannot bring water to parched fields, nor mend a broken bridge, but it can water an arid soul and mend a broken heart. Pray as if everything depends on God, but act as if everything depends on you. (Rabbi Jeffrey Kamins, Emanuel Synagogue)

A pilgrimage is a moment when people come from every corner of the world to share the spiritual experience. They come in humility and sincerity to God Almighty. (Imam Amin Hady, Zetland Mosque)

Look at your feet. There is your mind. See where your feet are. You are there. (Venerable Boan Sunim, Korean Puri Temple, Gordon)

Walk as if you are kissing the earth with your feet.  When we are walking with mindfulness, then the walker and that which is walked upon become one, the division between self /other dissolves into the sacredness of walking with a peaceful heart. (Zen Roshi – Subhana Barzaghi, Sydney Zen Centre)

In the journey of faith through life, we are given paths which help us to live more fully within that one journey. In the Christian liturgical tradition, every year is a pilgrimage celebrating the two primary cycles of Advent-Christmas and of Lent-Easter. Among the ways of reflecting and meditating on our journey of faith and our relationship with God and others, are such treasures as the Labyrinth. (Father Martin Davies , St James Church)

Nothing can bar or mar the paths of those who truly believe in the name. They depart from here with honour. They do not lose the proper path. The spirit of those imbued with faith is wedded to the realization of truth. (Jaspal Singh, Sikh Temple,)

One of the first things we find God doing in the Bible is walking in the garden of Eden in the cool of the day (Gen 3.8).  God promises the people: ‘I walk among you and be your God’ (Lev 26.12).  The Bible can pay no greater compliment than to say of some people that they ‘walked with God’ (Gen 5.4).  The apostle Paul describes the Christian life as walking by ‘faith’ not sight (2 Cor 5.7). (Rev Dr Geoff Broughton, Paddington Anglican Church)

For me, prayer is walking. Every step is a prayer. The way unfolds, and all it asks is trust and humility. The road always leads home. Step by step.  (Ailsa Piper, Writer and Pilgrim)